Elections 2017: Board Candidates

Richard Chesser

Head of Music, British Library

Personal Statement

Richard Chesser is delighted to be nominated to be a member of the MEI Board. Digital musicology is transforming the way that traditional music sources are navigated, studied and appreciated, and a particular attraction of the MEI community is that it allows experts in various disciplines – such as musicology, technology and bibliography – to work together and share ideas.  The British Library is pleased to be part of that community and is a partner in many projects concerned not only with optical recognition and encoding, but other developments such as IIIF and Big Data. Richard has been involved in an advisory capacity, or worked closely in other ways, with a number of projects such as Transforming Musicology, OCVE, SIMSSA, Early Music Online. Digital projects based on British Library material have used a range of musical sources such as 16th-century vocal music, Victorian theatre music, musicians’ letters, concert programmes and autographs of 20th-century composers. A current challenge is to devise ways of digitising more of the British Library heritage music collections in order to support and encourage further developments and research. I hope that greater involvement with the MEI world will help this.

Short Biography

Richard Chesser read Music at Cambridge University and undertook the Common Professional Examination in Law at London University. He joined the British Library as a music curator and became Head of Music there in 2007. His research interests range from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries: recent publications include The Land of Opportunity: Joseph Haydn and Britain (2013), a collection of essays jointly edited with David Wyn Jones, whilst Delius, Grainger and Warlock have been the subject of recent conference papers. He is active in many bodies in the field of music research, bibliography and copyright, having served as President of the UK and Ireland Branch of the International Association of Music Libraries 2010–13, and is currently Chair of the RISM (UK) Trust, a member of the RISM Verein, and a member of the Commission Mixte of RILM.


Axel Teich Geertinger

Head of Centre, Danish Centre for Music Editing
The Royal Library, Copenhagen

Personal Statement

I see the Music Encoding Inititative not only as a promising approach to encoding notated music and musical metadata, but also as a great opportunity to join efforts in the fields of music encoding and editing. The diversity of projects and the exchange of ideas within the community is most inspiring to me. I am also convinced that an open community like MEI is the best possible way of establishing a encoding recommendation able to meet the needs of a broad range of projects. I was elected a member of the MEI Board in 2014, and I would be happy to serve another term.
My own focus in working with MEI so far has mainly been the production of detailed catalogs of works; the most important results from our centre’s work with MEI are the online thematic catalog of Carl Nielsen’s works (CNW, http://www.kb.dk/cnw.html) and the software we use to create and maintain it (MerMEId, http://www.kb.dk/en/nb/dcm/projekter/mermeid.html).
I have a special interest in critical editing, and in the future I would like to focus on producing truly digital, critical editions, and possibly combining them with our catalogs to form sophisticated but practical presentations of musical works on a scholarly basis.

Short Biography

Engineering studies at the Technical University of Denmark 1989–92; MA in Musicology (University of Copenhagen), 2001; PhD in Musicology with a dissertation on Italian baroque opera sinfonia with focus on genre history and critical editing (University of Copenhagen), 2009; Researcher at the Danish Centre for Music Editing since 2009; Head of Centre since 2012. Main developer of the MerMEId metadata editor.
Member of the MEI Board since 2014 and co-chair of the MEI Cataloging and Metadata Interest Group (see http://music-encoding.org/community/mei-organization/interest-groups-ig/).
Main publications: Critical editions of 19th-century Danish music (Niels W. Gade, Hans Christian Lumbye, Peter Heise). Co-editor on a number of other editions and the thematic-bibliographic catalog of Carl Nielsen’s works (CNW).
More information about projects and publications at the Danish Centre for Music Editing: http://www.kb.dk/en/nb/dcm


Andrew Hankinson

Faculty of Music, University of Oxford

Personal Statement

I have been involved with the Music Encoding Initiative since 2010. I am the author or co-author of several publications about MEI, and have developed a number of MEI-related software packages, including libmei and the Sibelius MEI plugin. I currently serve on the MEI Technical Team, where I help oversee the tools and infrastructure to support MEI development on GitHub. I would be delighted to continue helping the MEI community grow and expand by serving on the MEI Board.

Short Biography

Nov. 2015–Present Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Music, University of Oxford Jan.–Nov. 2015 Postdoctoral Fellow, Schulich School of Music, McGill University

Ph.D. (Music Technology), McGill University, 2015.
Dissertation: “Optical music recognition infrastructure for large-scale music document analysis.” Advisors: Ichiro Fujinaga, Julie Cumming

Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS), McGill University, 2007. Bachelor of Music (Theory and History), Acadia University, 2004.


Johannes Kepper

Beethovens-Werkstatt
University of Paderborn

Personal Statement

After being involved with MEI for more than ten years now, MEI has become a very important part of my work life. In the upcoming years, I believe it will continue to grow in importance, certainly in the projects I work on. However, the most impressive thing to me about MEI is the community behind it, which is truly open and collaborative. I hope to be instrumental in the further development of both the standard and this community, and I‘d be honored if the community decides that my place to serve is as a member of the MEI Board.

Short Biography

I’m a research assistant at the Musicological Institute in Detmold, Germany. Together with my colleagues, I work on the Beethovens Werkstatt project. Before that, I was involved in several other MEI-related projects, including Edirom and Freischütz Digital. In 2009, I completed my PhD with a dissertation on the history and digital perspectives of scholarly editions of music. In the same year, Maja Hartwig, Kristina Richts, Perry Roland and I were able to lay the foundation for the MEI community as it stands today through our DFG / NEH-funded project. That project ended with the first Music Encoding Conference, held in 2013 at the Academy of Sciences in Mainz. Two years later, I was elected into the first MEI Board and have served as Administrative Chair since then.


David Lewis

University of Oxford e-Research Centre
Institut für Musikwissenschaft, Universität des Saarlandes
Goldsmiths, University of London

Personal Statement

When I first encountered MEI, it seemed to me both a brilliant approach to music representation, and of little practical help to me at the time. In the more than 15 years since, MEI has developed immensely on three important fronts – the expressiveness of the representation, the range of available tools, and the size and quality of the community. Through my work with tablature and with mensural notation, I want to help grow the richness of MEI. At Oxford I participate in the development of public-facing tools, building on the strengths of the format. I think that the last of the three, though – the size and quality of the community – is the most important, and the one where MEI has been most successful in recent years.
For me, the community that has built up around MEI is extraordinary in both its quality and its collegiality. We still need to expand our range and scope. This is already happening, promoted through the annual conference and the Edirom summer school, along with members’ other dissemination activities. As a member of the MEI Board, I would aim to support this expansion and keep it sustainable.

Short Biography

David Lewis is currently employed as a researcher at the Oxford e-Research Centre and the Musicology Institute at the University of Saarland in Germany.
Trained as a musicologist, David completed his Master’s degree at King’s College London, specialising in Historical Musicology. Since then, he has worked as a researcher on a range of digital musicology projects. His work includes building corpora, such as the Electronic Corpus of Lute Music; digital scholarly editions of music treatises, for example ‘Johannes Tinctoris: Complete Theoretical Works’ (http://earlymusictheory.org/Tinctoris) and ‘Thesaurus Musicarum Italicarum’ (http://tmiweb.science.uu.nl); and works catalogues (‘Delius Catalogue of Works’). He has taught on both music and computing degree programmes, and helped design and deliver the Digital Musicology workshop in the ‘Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School’. His two-volume study guide on database systems has been published by the University of London and is used for their undergraduate International Program.
David is a member of the MEI mensural notation special interest group, and has co-authored a proposed MEI tablature module for lute and guitar music.


Klaus Rettinghaus

Bach-Repertorium
Bach-Archiv Leipzig

Personal Statement

I’m interested in MEI in it’s entirety as an open and well-documented standard for encoding musical and musicological information. For future perspectives amongst other things I’m looking into creating a subset of MEI as an widely accepted interchange format for feeding meta-catalogues (like correspDesc for TEI, see http://correspsearch.net). I would be glad to serve the MEI Board in further development of MEI and spreading the word about it, bringing more people to the growing community.
I feel deeply honoured to be nominated for the MEI Board.

Short Biography

I first studied physics, and after the diploma I studied musicology and theology. I received my PhD in Musicology 2012. Since 2011 I have been a research assistant at the project “Bach Repertorium” of the Saxon Academy of Sciences, located at the Leipzig Bach Archive. As an editor I published some works in the classical analogus way. A focal point of my work lies in developing the Bach digital platform. For the last years I‘ve been working intensively with MEI, e.g. in creating a catalogue raisonné using MerMEId. I take part in developing tools for the DH in general and especially for MEI (please check my GitHub account).


Eleanor Selfridge-Field

Stanford University

Personal Statement

As an advocate for the establishment of MEI, I have been involved in this enterprise since its beginnings more than a decade ago.  Over the past two years, I have served on the first MEI Board. It has been rewarding to witness the growth and expanding breadth of the entire enterprise.  I will continue to promote this expansion and encourage the “uptake” of MEI in the preparation of digital critical editions beyond their current boundaries. I also endorse the consensus model on which MEI operates.  MEI has fostered a wonderful community of diligent workers and I have considerable confidence in its ability to achieve its goals.

Short Biography

Eleanor Selfridge-Field teaches musical informatics at Stanford University, does research on encoded music for the Packard Humanities Institute, consults on digital humanities for various agencies, and maintains deep involvements in historical musicology.